About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CSPAN 29
CSPAN2 9
MSNBCW 7
CNNW 5
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 4
KGO (ABC) 3
CNBC 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
SFGTV 1
SFGTV2 1
LANGUAGE
English 77
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
strong. like education, the ability of students to attend college, medical research and inthe noah vation, the about of -- ability of our older neighbors to live their lives in dignity in their retirement years through medicare and long-term care. now we get a lot of advice and economists across the board, in fact, our own congressional budget office, advise that the best and fastest way to reduce the deficit to is to make sure people across america have jobs and are working. it is inexplicable that the republican budget proposes to eliminate jobs in construction, in education, scientific research, and instead heaps the burden on middle class families. experts predict the republican budget will reresult in job losses of two million fewer jobs next year alone. that's on top of 750,000 jobs lost by the end of the year due to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close t
's not without the controversy, but the budget cuts that are from educators to parents about the morality of corporate advertising in schools is certainly causing a stir. yet, filling the financial shortfall is the biggest prem fa prem-- problem facing schools today. and he needs funding. >> american public education is in financial crisis. >> he heads up education funding partners, a colorado firm that matches it with schools looking for cash. >> they want the right partners and the right controls, our model gives them that control. >> over the years more schools have been turning to corporate sponsors for much needed revenue. they struck a deal with staples in exchange for ads on the district's website and a supply list containing a coupon and kids got to attend the science enrichment program. >> it's really about selling anything, it's about allowing companies to come in and partner for a good cause and public education in responsible ways. >> there are aggressive campaigns out there buses and playing fields becoming common. for some districts it's what keep the doors open. critics arg
deficit. for students in detroit problems with the education system are being magnified by that community's economic troubles. if you look statewide a quarter of michigan children under 17 were living in poverty in 2011. compare that to detroit where the number is more than twice that much. it is 57%, folks. nearly two in three detroit children 5 and under are below the poverty line. msnbc's correspondent joins us live from detroit where she'll cohost a summit on education today and a student town hall tomorrow. those numbers are frightening and daunting. >> they really are startling numbers. i've got my notebook with me because i'm going to school today, chris. it has a lot of people worried and concerned and working to change the dynamics of those numbers. that's what we'll be talking about here. many people are also concerned about the fact, the elephant in the room we can't dismiss that come monday the city of detroit will be under the auspices of an emergency financial manager. people should also know for the past four years detroit schools have been under emergency management and in
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
the education and i think that they are generally more serious student and demand more from all of us in the classroom. >> host: in our look how to succeed in college, you have a chapter, sub chapter the liberal ivory tower. can a conservative student -- can a student who is conservative be successful, out of harvard, an american? >> guest: absolutely. let's go back and take that turn in the book to dispel the myth. these are not a bastion of liberalism that are unfriendly to conservatives. what we are s after if i'm doing my job right any student who comes in here is going to have his preexisting who views challenged whether they are liberal or conservative those kids are going to be challenged to think about what they really believe in, taken the information that we are leaving and leave with their own view in the world. if i am doing my job right that is what is happening to it and that ought to be both exciting and probably to some extent little frightening to students, no matter what their political selective is because ultimately we want them to be critical consumers of informat
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
that is required by formula. the public education services baseline, we need to maintain the level of funding that was provided to the school during the years during that 6.7 million and then here are the amounts for the public education enrichment fund. so, taken together, all of these baselines amount to 450 million dollars of discretionary funds. and then similar to those baselines, we have others that are specified to be certain percentages of certain taxes, so you have parking tax and property tax are the ones, so mta receives 80% of parking tax in lieu, and what that means is that the parking tax comes into the general fund and we give mta general fund money in the same dollar amount, so that amounts to 61 million dollars, similarly with the library, 2.5% of property tax, this is an additional 37 million, open space, 37 million, the children's fund of 44.7 million, the municipal symphony, 2 million, and then the hotel tax as we discussed earlier, 88 million that is then budgeted, 56 million of that is budgeted in the general fund. >> so, the open space fund is getting an additional 37 m
billion in one year. we spend about $100 billion on education. we spend about $40 billion-plus, a little over, on highways, roads and bridges. that's just an example. we are now surging from 200, 250 in interest to 800 in interest as a result of the accounting that c.b.o. has provided us if we follow this path. it's going to crowd out spending for research. it's going to crowd out spending for children, education, health care and any other program this government wishes to undertake, including defense. mr. president, what kind of time limit might i inquire? is it 30 minutes on this side on this motion? the presiding officer: on the motion, there is one hour equally divided. would the senator like to call up his motion? mr. sessions: my first question would be how much time is left on my half of that hour? the presiding officer: the motion has not yet been called. mr. sessions: well, i would call up the motion, mr. president. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: the senator from alabama, mr. sessions, moves to recommit senate concurrent resolution 8 back to
themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing revenues appropriately, reforming tax expenditures to reduce they will on the equivalent of% o 7% or 8a year, thee myriad of tax expenditures in the tax code were able to find cuts. the senate budget in achieving additional deficit reduction is a balanced approach that will make us stronger, not weaker, and that's why it is my great hope that we will pass this in a significant way. i thank the chairman. i thank you, madam president. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senators virginia and hawaii for excellent statements and really laying out the framework
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
government at home and abroad. >> rand paul wants to accomplish the departments of education and congress and epa. >> small detail. >> and the federal reserve and abolish the income tax. the second amendment which does not allow in his opinion for any form of gun control whatsoever. he makes mitt romney look looks michael due dukakis. >> i paint in primary colors. >> these are details. >> they are details i would just as soon ignore. on some of those fronts. but, again, overall, the primary message that he delivers is less government at home and restraint abroad which you know what? the republican party has been reckless over the past decade. we have paid a lot for it with our philosophy. and so i think he's a good symbol like his father. listen. i voted for his father in the republican primary in 2012. did i agree with what he said about 9/11? >> god, i hope not. >> absolutely not. there are a lot of things that rand paul said i think are way out there and i disagree with, but the core issue of small government at home and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic se
. sons,cided that her four and the youngest, would be better served by a per educational methods than by various public schools -- would be better served by her educational methods. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in rk.viding that sparked -- spa i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. do you think that is derived from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at bats, and we would go to the dictionary and looking it up -- and i got pretty good at that. and we would go to the d
, and the youngest, would be -- i'm the youngest and would be better served by her educational methods than by various public schools. the family traveled around between north carolina, long island, and virginia. i think she was right. she was remarkably gifted in providing that spark. it's what you really want to see education represent. i learned to love learning because of the way she introduced me to topics. it was very chaotic, i must say. >> what was the day like? >> it was totally unpredictable. there was no lesson plan or curriculum standards. my mother would say, ok, what is interesting today, and some days, it would be mathematics, and we might do only mathematics for three days in a row because it was interesting, and then it would get tiresome, and she would say, let's talk about history and talk about what the significance of that event was, and she was a playwright and very interested in languages. we did a lot of study of languages, and she would say, "ok, here is a word. from greek or old french or latin?" and i got pretty good at that, and we would go to the unabridged dict
very passionatably as someone that grew up in new york city and bronx. my mom was an educator, worked in parts and administration for the district of education. the vanishing middle class in new york city, it is really a staggering thing to hold. having watched the trajectory of this city, the rising inequality, the losses of middle class jobs and low paying service jobs and then the -- massive increase in the cost of housing. i want to talk about how to stop new york from becoming essentially 1%, 99% city right after this. way the bristles moe to the way they clean, once you try an oral-b deep sweep power brush, you'll never want to go back. its dynamic power bristles reach between teeth to remove up to 76% more plaque than sonic in hard to reach areas. oral-b deep sweep 5000 power brush. >> announcer: did you know there are secret black market websites around the world that sell stolen identities? >> 30-year-old american man, excellent credit rating. >> announcer: lifelock monitors thousands of these sites 24 hours a day. and if we discover any of our members' data for sale, lifeloc
come together and build new opportunities for housing to go in there. we could have adult education programs in there. we could have transitional opportunities for clinics. we could do a lot of things. let's not have a bunch of 52 plus buildings abandoned in our community. we do not need another eyesore. >> we're looking at the zool board voting on this on may 22nd. any chance of them turning back this decision? >> historically when they put out this list, and they put it out every year. we call it the hit list. they have carry through all the closings on the list. in the first six years there was something like 60 schools on the list. last year they were 22. they hit all 22. that being said, they've never done anything on this scale anywhere in the country. and so we're counting on a huge public outcry among people who are invested in the communities. parents, children, educators, all of us to make a stand and say don't do this in our city. don't dismantle our schools in such a scale. and we're prepared to make protests and speak out and hopefully the policymakers will change their
in the republican party. withling to them educational choice and opportunity and small business. with the exception of nevada, the asian vote collapsed. now, michael targeting. e have heard from michael -- now, micro targeting. we have heard from michael barone. a friend of mine was handed an ipad and a clipboard before the election and was told, "this is the precinct you are going to walk." is onlysaid, "this four households." and they said, "that is ok. we have collins the messages -- , andve honed the messages we have decided that this is the script to appeal to those voters, and your job is to go out and get those, and nothing else. we will give you another precinct in the afternoon." she found them, and they were home, and she got the votes. that is micro targeting. ford, a former head of the council, he has said, of course, obama had a powerful message, but he was also able to find voters in places like colorado and florida that have not been found before, and we will have to emulate that if we want to have success. lastly, there is one thing we have to worry about. we are seeing an attempt t
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated. we want to lift people up from poverty, to put the american dream in reached for everybody. our party cannot hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climbed the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children we will champion school choice and solutions to lowering the cost of health care. instead of arithmetic our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. our 80 percent friend is not our 20 percent enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful of those who don't agree with a hundred percent of them. finding common ground with voters will be a top priority. so first, we're going to learn
and educational grants to train people how to be safe in using their guns, and also provide for an age level for young people not being able to have these guns. this is the way that america wants us to go. let us travel a pattern of saving jobs and preventing gun violence, intervening in the lives of those who need our protection. that's what this congress should be doing, providing the pathway for america's success. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from kentucky seek recognition? mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that the speaker may postpone further proceedings on the motion to concur in the senate amendments to h.r. 933, as though under clause 8-a-1-a of rule 20. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. bjection is heard. objection is withdrawn. there is no objection, so ordered. the gentleman from contract seek recognition. mr. rogers: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all may have five legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on h.r.
and innovation that relates to energy. it's about investing in education so that we are competitive and number one to build that, strengthens and sustains our commitment to our seniors, whether it's their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, billion, almost $100 $the 8 billion from pell grants, $100 billion from pell grants, and in the decade ends the is a job uarantee loser in the short-term and even more so in the long-term. so the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values to support of the middle class, which is the backbone of our democracy. again honoring the vows of our founders. the other a job loser ends the medicare guarantee and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. be - now our members will taking that message home about the contrast in budget priorities about the observance of the third year anniversary of health care, affordable care act, and what that means in the lives of america's working families. and in celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader until rome, pope f
, but john did. >> she was born in england and educated in france and she remained a phone personality to many of the adams, but not to henry as a world traveler herself. she was very well educated, very sophisticated socially i would say. she sort of entertained john quincy's road to the white house. >> she was not happy about returning to washington as the wife of a congressman. >> louisa catherine adams essentially became the campaign manager for her husband, john quincy adams' run for the presidency in 1824 by dominating the capital city's social circuit. following a contested election, the adams' four years in the white house were a turbulent period in american politics and washington society. we'll look at louisa adams' relationship with her husband john quincy adams and john and abigail on the road to 1600 pennsylvania avenue. good evening and welcome to our continuing series on first ladies influence and image in partnership with the white house historical association. the next installment is on louisa catherine adams, the wife of john quincy adams. we have two guests at the ta
find something pretty big in the department of education. we'll tell what you is up there. >>> a manhunt is underway after a prison director is gunned down in cold blood in his own home. ♪ [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you? fight back fast with tums. calcium-rich tums starts working so fast you'll forget you had heartburn. ♪ tum tum tum tum tums martha: this is a possible big setback for gun control advocates. senate majority leader harry reid says that he is dropping the assault weapons ban part of this which is really what we've been talking about all along. dropping that from the senate's gun control package. i'm joined by senator scott brown who is not at all surprised by this action. the former u.s. senator and fox news contributor joins us now. senator, good to have you with us to america's newsroom. >> thank you very much. martha: a lot of people talked about the big talk on sought weapons ban and it was so important to be passed. now it is not in the bill and been deleted. >> he is particular harry
went. you know, i could not see you with a west point education, it has opened up a lot.it is much more of a liberal arts education now. then it was engineering and military tactics. i had no interest in that at all and i did not want a military career. >> when did you first read "witness"? >> so many years ago. i cannot remember when, probably when i was in college and after that cold friday, and i read "witness", i think three times now.my family has not to read it. with communism having waned, it will be harder for them to do it. >> so what is the big deal? >> he was a great writer, a beautiful writer, but he was a soviet spy, who ultimately rejected communism, embraced christianity, and felt the struggle in the world was not just between the soviet union and the united states, it was between communism and christianity. but of course he famously said he thought he was joining the losing side not the winning side, and then, of course, his famous clash with the state department official who he identified as the communist spy and all the liberal intelligence, and ultimately, now we know
of world war i, so they thought to make up for the loss and interruption of their education, thegd send them all to university for six months just to round out their education. blackett was sent to cambridge, and he said one day i wandered over to the cavendish laboratory to see what a scientific lahr story was like, and very shortly after that he told the navy i want to become a scientist. he never did receive a ph.d., but he quickly became one of the world's foremost physicists for the work he did in the 1930s discovering the positive terror, the positive electron, the first piece of antimatter whose existence was confirmed. he would win the nobel prize in physics in 1948. he was good looking, had an extraordinary combination of hands-on ability and theoretical imagination. his colleagues remarked they'd never known anyone his equal in his ability to conceive of a problem in physics, write out a few lines of mathematics, design an ap apparatus, build it himse, carry out the experiment, analyze the results. he was also one of a number of scientists in britain and america who had been w
of various scenarios, how things can be handled. a few, what is happening? caller: i am in education, and we have civilians students and military in the same classes. of theworking options next go around of not having civilians in the classroom because they cannot be in there for five days a week. we are looking at all the different options, have to spend a lot of tried -- time. host: let's hear from another federal worker, a democrat in virginia. good morning, michael. say godi would like to bless america and c-span, and thank you for being here. i would like to say, the sequestration is going to have a big affect up and down the east coast, from here to texas, that firstpan into the early and second quarter of next year. work, psychologically, i see people slowing down. you know, inlike, a grip, waiting for some thing to happen. i have friends and other agencies, and other parts of virginia and places. i just see the intensity. cut ofu throw in the almost $10,000 for me, for 22 days, you add the payroll tax, i am looking at a setback of -- or a contraction of 13,000 dollars or $14,000 this
-around you that could potentially be toxic to your body. education is key. if you have any concerns, as always, discuss them with your physician, those are my doctor's orders, thanks for joining us! [ crowd cheering ] [ applause ] ♪ >> (male announcer): live from the bay area this is the kron 4 morning news. kron 4 news at 4 starts now. >> good morning. it is friday march 22nd. we are taking a live look at the golden gate bridge. some days in it. not bad. >> let us find out about whether and traffic. us start with the weather. good morning erica. >> good morning james happy friday. we're starting off with clear conditions around the bay area. though winds howling over night. gusty winds from the coast the water. strongest from the north bay mountains. right now we are dealing with tippers in the '40's. not to bad of a start as we head into the afternoon. we will see plenty of sunshine. we could see low seventies for a handful of locations. >> letter to my id will be clear and mild temperatures back down to the '50s and '60s. >> looking at conditions. 40 degrees and napa. vallejo 3
than any other time; progressive education, where we've spent more per capita on students but are getting less and less return on the test scores. those aren't my ideas, morals, ideals, and values, that's the other side's. so i'm trying to get them to defend their philosophy and get a controversy and debate going with this book. >> where were you born? >> i was born in washington, d.c. my mother was there at the time, so it was convenient for both of us. >> and what were your parents doing here? >> well, my dad was a very successful salesman. my mom is a homemaker and is still living. he sold business equipment, calculating machines, and move here at the age of 19 from another washington-- washington, indiana, the oldest of nine children. he and all of his brothers were in the army during world war ii and never expected to give birth, to sire a journalist like myself. there was nobody like me in the family, and i thk there are some family members who may be grateful for that. >> and how many brothers and sisters? >> well, i have one brother, a younger brother. >> what's he
, it educates and it moves us. it even angers us and painfully reminds us of all the hatred and injustice so many of our citizens endured at the hands of their fellow countrymen. and today just as i was at their teen years old i'm still an off how these two great men took a chance and risked so much to stand up for literally millions of people. when i look at that photo and after reading dr. carlo' book i'm reminded of the notion that nothing endures more than your character. and the simple yet daunting question of how you want to be remembered. he was one of our host earlier today and summed it up and he said even long after john carlos is physically gone his influence will be very much alive in that iconic photo. nothing could be a more revered legacy. in the case of dr. carlo's he spent only two and a half pages of this entire book describing his actual 200-meter bronze medal race, his enduring character has transcended the memory of that medal for he has so many other things to be proud of. here are just a few of them. his harlem upbringing, his 200-meter world records, being inducted in
on the state, education, general fund. >> new york and california, 100 percent goes to education. most of it is to -- pennsylvania all to senior citizens. veterans affairs, that teach thing. there are some states, like rhode island, where it can go into the general fund and the state can use it as its session. as i said, they have plenty of things to spend it on now. >>heather: so, do you think more states will consider having the lottery? >> they don't have any money. they are either going to raise taxes which is not popular at all or cut spending and they are doing all of those things. this has proven to be such a huge money maker for states. it's $20 billion more in just a few years they is earned. it is a lot of money. >>heather: you mention the payout of $4 2 billion in prize money and that was included because we were all offer it, and the payout included $587 million powerball jackpot in 2012 and now we have $338 million and already this year in 2013. >> but the winners do not get all that money. uncle sam takes his and it depends whether you take a lump sum. 80 percent choose t
. new york educators have given the green light for a curriculum that contains picture books with realistic details of war. they include the librarian of basra which contains drawings of fighter planes dropping bombs on a palm tree lined middle eastern town and people wondering who will die. the lessons will be used in third through fifth grade. >>steve: wonder whose idea that is? >>ainsley: not mine. >>steve: 25 minutes before the top of the hour. we were talking about the bracket. he's our bracketeer, mr. kilmeade. >>brian: let's talk basketball. louisville scoring the top seed tournament last night. other top seeds: kansas in the south, gonzaga in the west and indiana in the east. kentucky failing to make the tournament. they are stunned. tempers flaring after denny hamlin hits his former teammate, spinning him around. begano racing over to hamlin. the two had to be pulled apart. then they went to a twitter war. they are really mad at each other and called each other out. and now the two bushes finishing the top five. coming up between 9 and noon between kilmeade and frie
any educator would try to justify any terrorist attacks against the united states that killed 3,000 innocent americans. it's not just this one question. she also says that the test had some other issues as well that talked about whether food and medicine and shelter were rights or responsibilities. her son got that one wrong as well saying it was a responsibility. that it's not the government that should be in your lives making sure there is shelter over your head, making sure you have food on the table, medicine to keep you well and health care essentially. she says this is the american dream that i believe in. that's what i've been trying to teach my kids and this test is going against it. >>brian: it was on facebook and now has become a huge story. an update on that fox news alert. a shooting in quantico, virginia, where a suspected shooter killed two marines and then killed himself. sherry ly joins us live with the details. when did this happen? >> this happened at 11:00 last night at the officer candidate school. we're told that the gunman and the two victims were all activ
more humanitarian assistance and basic services including education for syrian children so far from home whose lives have been upended. and i think as parents we can only imagine how heartbreaking that must be for any parent to see their children having to go through the kinds of turmoil that they're experiencing. our cooperation on syria's an example of how the partnership between the united states and jordan improves the lives not only of the jordanian people but peoples across the region. so, again, your majesty, i want to express my great appreciation for our partnership. and i want to thank you and the jordanian people for the friendship and hospitality that they've shown me and to my fellow americans. and just as i visited the citadel here in amman, i'm looking forward to seeing petra tomorrow, weather permitting. one of the great wonders of history that the world can experience thanks to the care and dedication of jordan and its people. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you, your majesty. >> i will ask you -- are you going to keep open for the syrian refugees. next to you is
of things simultaneously and trying to educate ourselves, if you will, truly it's a fact-finding mission for us right now to determine what that background consisted of and where that leads us is yet to be known. >> all right. and then now a finally all colorado corrections facilities are under lockdown through the weekend. so is that just a precaution or are you concerned there could be more violence? >> well, i can't speak to the increased security that the department of corrections is exercising at this point. obviously they have to make sure that they do their own asse assessment and what they feel might be remaining risks or not and make decisions accordingly. and then we recognize that amongst various executives across the state that's something that we're actively engaged in in terms of providing additional security from our perspective. but we realize that because there is no conclusive, you know, ending to this case yet, it's unknown on whether or not there is a remaining threat or not. >> lieutenant kramer, thank you for taking the time. the latest information we have from texa
of the health education committee, this is not just a veterans issue, it is an issue for the entire nation, but we have in terms of mental health providers. these long wait times that i mentioned are partially caused by staffing shortages. i am pleased that secretaries hassecchi -- shinsechi applied to hire more mental health conditions. as of the 13th they fired more than3000, including more 1100 of these new mental health clinicians. this is good progress towards reaching their goal. emphasize this point, i am very concerned that va has hired only 37 clinicians in the last two months. i understand the challenges. i think we all understand the challenges. you do not walk down the street and get the first person. you want to make sure the person you are hiring is well-trained and of the quality that the veterans deserve, but clearly the va must step up hiring if they intend to meet their goal of 16 new clinicians by june of this year. they will be attempting to meet over 500 in the next few months and i do not see how that is possible. we do want to talk to the va about how they are moving
in pakistan and got attention as she pushed for education rights for girls. she has a reason to celebrate in her new home. >> paula faris behind the wheel, learning firsthand about driving distracted when her kids are demanding her attention from the back seat. the safety lessons she learned that could happy any parent. >>> first the historic visit by president obama to israel. the first time mr. obama visited the jewish state in his presidency. he will be greeted in tel aviv by top israeli leaders and then whisked to high-level meetings. >> the trip is expected to be rich in symbolism, and a speech by the president to israeli people to pledge friendship and security. >> with the mideast in turmoil and because of so much uncertainty in the region the trip is a high profile one. >> alex marquardt is in jerusalem. where the president meets with prime minister netanyahu today. alex, good morning, the trip we hear so much about symbolism is that code for not a lot of substance. break it down for us. >> reporter: good morning, yeah, i think you are absolutely right. the trip
country at the forefront of the global economy. israelis understand the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. that spirit has led to economic growth and progress. ,olar power, electric cars synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they , home ofok at tel aviv research centers and startups. [applause] are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. twoy the trade between our countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is
trip, your education, bank account, car, house, et cetera aonly serve on goal, fulfill your main mission. develop ties in policy making circles in in the u.s. and send intelligence reports to center. they took numerous surveillance photos with other russian spies and recorded this video of a federal russian living near washington, d.c. under the name michael zatoli. the murphies zatoli and others lived across the united states. they pursued academic degrees and held jobs in banking in telecom. donald heath field and tracy leeann foley even groomed their son to become a spy. >> we say long-term it is 30 years, it's get your second generation into the united states. >> coming up... >> local montclair police cars and fbi agents coming in and out of their house. it was just a shshshshshshsh >> you are my wife. >> in the television series "the americans" keri russell and matthew reese play russian spies living under deep cover as a suburban couple. the series was inspired the fbi's ghost stories which revealed a russian spy ring here in america. >> one of the things we looked for in t
to entertain you but to educate you. so on this fabulous eighth anniversary of "mad money," i want you to continue to call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. welcome to the eighth anniversary edition of "mad money." not a great day for an anniversary although the dow broke its winning streak. i'll be unabashed about it. sinking 25 points. nasdaq declining -- i realized regular people that play this game needed help. you needed guidance from someone impartial who wasn't after your fees, didn't want your commissions. in short, you needed an investing coach. i've been trying to fill that role every night five nights a week ever since. so tonight to mark the show's fantastic eighth anniversary, we're going to do the exact same thing we always do, help you try to make some money the best way we know how. let's get into it. start with the game plan. we've got a smatter of earnings coming out. before we get to that focus on the event that will control the market next week, there's not too much to this because wednesday there's a federal reserve meeting. i'm going to be blunt. from now on we are on fbfh wa
with the good things you can do. have a good job, have a good education, buy them flowers. >> police say they decided not to charge him with a crime since he admitted to being behind the fake attack. >>> the engagement ring napoleon game to the woman who become emporess is for sale. it's being auctioned off in paris today. it may look a little unimpressive but they say napoleon scraped and scrounged together to buy the ring as he was a young officer and not at all rich at the time. >>> they have always been hands on but now they are taking it a step further. >> all we do is touch our hands together and it makes a musical note. >> next, an exclusive inside look at how they are tinkering with the whole >> welcome back, everyone. it's 5:30 ask we are starting this half-hour off with a quick look at the weather. here's meteorologist lisa argen. >> good morning, katie. hi, everyone. from emeryville another quiet start to the day. we saved the best weather, the fair skies and warmest temperatures for the rest of the weekend. today very little fog. just a little bit around half moon bay. number
they are getting or not. if you borrow do finance a college education, make sure you have a plan to pay off the debt when you take out the loan. cited in the "wall street journal", a company says parents should not borrow more than they can pay back in ten years and avoid plus loans if can you and look for loans with lower rates. we have a higher open for stocks, cyprus seized some money in large bank accounts and get bailed out by other european countries so we are responding positively to that. the silicon valley index is half percent up. the move to legalize marijuana is getting attention in finance. companies in the industry are pitching ideas to investors trying to raise money to grow the business but many are trying to stick to the edge of the business but not merit -- but not marijuana. there is a free map that automatically adjusts your screen color if you have been based on sunset time. this could help avoid the dread of blue light that l.e.d. screens emit that can make it hard to sleep at night. >> 6:49. we have clouds out there. and now, lisa, how does it look? >> sunrise in 15 m
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)